Policies and Procedures

The menu on the left provides a list of policy information available from this site.

UBC is a large and complex institution. Policies related to graduate students are governed by different bodies within the University depending on the scope and content of each policy. The units you will have the most contact with are, the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, the Faculty of Applied Science and Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies.

The descriptions here outline what each policy is, links to forms and further information as well as what unit within the University you may need to contact.

Please send your policy and procedure questions to help [at] ece [dot] ubc [dot] ca.

Academic Progress

All students working towards a graduate degree will have their progress reviewed regularly and at least once a year by the Dean of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies. Upon this review students may be asked to withdraw from the graduate program if unsatisfactory progress has been made towards completion of the degree. If progress is deemed to be unsatisfactory all students will be informed in writing before any further action is taken towards to withdraw.

For more information on UBC policies and procedures on academic progress please click here. Any further questions can be directed towards the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies.

Progress Reports

All MASc and PhD graduate students and their supervisors (or supervisory committee) in Electrical and Computer Engineering will be asked to complete an annual report detailing their progress over each academic year. Upon receipt of the completed document, the department/Graduate Advisor will determine if the student’s progress has been satisfactory, and make any necessary recommendations. Student's who do not advance to candidacy within 15 months of their start date will be asked to submit a progress report. A report will be due every 3 months until the qualifying exam is held.

Unsatisfactory Academic Progress

Definition of Satisfactory Academic Progress for MASc/MEng Students:

A minimum of 60% must be obtained in any course taken for the student to be granted pass standing. However, only 6 credits of pass standing may be counted towards a Master’s program. For all other courses, a minimum of 68% must be obtained.

On the recommendation of the graduate program and the approval of the Dean of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies (for MASc students) or the Faculty of Applied Science (for MEng students), the student may repeat a course for higher standing or take an alternate course.  When repeating a failed required course, a minimum mark of 74% must be obtained.  Higher minimum grades may be required. 

If the graduate program does not make such a recommendation, or if the recommendation is not approved by Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies or Faculty of Applied Science, the student may be required to withdraw.  A student who obtains a grade of less than 68% in an excessive number of courses will normally be required to withdraw.  The student will be informed of unsatisfactory academic progress in writing before any action regarding withdrawal is taken.

Fail (F) for individual courses is defined as below 60%.  If a course is repeated, both marks will appear on the transcript. The higher mark will be used to determine promotion and in any decision to admit or withdraw a student from the program.  For all other purposes, averages will be calculated using both marks.

 

Definition of Satisfactory Academic Progress for PhD Students:

A minimum of 68% must be achieved in all coursework taken for credit.  Where less than 68% is obtained, and on the recommendation of the graduate program and approval of the Dean of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies, the student may repeat the course for higher standing or take an alternate course.  When repeating a failed required course, a minimum mark of 74% must be obtained.  Higher minimum grades may be required.

If the graduate program does not make such a recommendation, or if the recommendation is not approved by G+PS, the student will be required to withdraw.  A student who obtains a grade of less than 68% in more than one course will normally be required to withdraw.  The student will be informed of unsatisfactory academic progress in writing before any action regarding withdrawal is taken.

Fail (F) for individual courses is defined as below 68%.  If a course is repeated, both marks will appear on the transcript. The higher mark will be used to determine promotion and in any decision to admit or withdraw a student from the program.  For all other purposes, averages will be calculated using both marks.

Deferred Standing

Deferred Standing may be granted by the Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science when a student has a valid reason for not completing course requirements as scheduled and does not qualify for Aegrotat Standing (see Academic Concession).

Deferred Standing is appropriate if medical or personal problems (of a very unusual nature) make it impossible for the student to complete the course requirements on time, but the requirements can be completed with an extension of time. In this case, the student’s Supervisor should send a memo to the Dean of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies as early as possible recommending Deferred Standing and the reasons for the recommendation. The Deferred Standing will then be entered in the student’s record and transcript.

Students granted Deferred Standing in the Winter Session must complete all outstanding course requirements by August 23 of the following Summer Session.  Students granted Deferred Standing in the Summer Session must complete all outstanding work by December 25 of the following Winter Session.

Students granted Deferred Standing are responsible for making satisfactory arrangements with their instructors for completion of outstanding course requirements. If a student fails to complete the outstanding requirements by the dates specified, the Deferred Standing will be replaced with a grade or standing that reflects requirements completed in the course. Students unable to meet the specified deadlines because of further medical, emotional or other difficulties must make an additional application for Academic Concession no later than August 31 for Winter Session courses or December 31 for Summer Session courses following the original deferral.

Further information on deferred standing can be found on the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies website.

Senate Appeals on Academic Standing

Students who wish to protest decisions relating to their academic studies may do so.  The protest should be made initially as near the source of difficulty as possible, presumably an instructor, and progress to the Department Head and then to the Dean of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies.  There is a standing committee of the University Senate, the Committee on Appeals on Academic Standing, that reviews all appeals made to the Senate, the senior academic authority in the University.  Please follow the policies and procedures as outlined here.

Academic and Scholarly Integrity/Standards

All UBC students are expected to familiarize themselves with the standards for academic and scholarly integrity at UBC. Below are useful links concerning academic integrity (including plagiarism) and intellectual property. Please review the links below for details on university expectations and student responsibilities. If you have any questions on the policies regarding academic integrity, please consult your supervisor or course instructor. 

https://www.grad.ubc.ca/current-students/student-responsibilities 

http://www.calendar.ubc.ca/vancouver/index.cfm?tree=3,286,0,0  

Student Responsibilities/Declaration

Upon registering, a student has initiated a contract with the University and is bound by the following declaration:

"I hereby accept and submit myself to the statutes, rules and regulations, and ordinances (including bylaws, codes, and policies) of The University of British Columbia, and of the faculty or faculties in which I am registered, and to any amendments thereto which may be made while I am a student of the University, and I promise to observe the same."

The student declaration is important. It imposes obligations on students and affects rights and privileges including property rights. You must not enrol as a student at the University if you do not agree to become bound by the declaration above. By agreeing to become a student, you make the declaration above and agree to be bound by it.

Each student is required to furnish the information necessary for the University record, to keep Enrolment Services informed of changes in name and contact information.

Students are required to inform themselves of the statutes, rules and regulations, and ordinances (including bylaws, codes, and policies) and to any amendments thereto applicable at the University. For policies and procedures issued by the Board of Governors, see the University of British Columbia Policy and Procedure Handbook or the Office of the University Counsel for the official text. For policies issued by the Vancouver Senate, see the Senate for up-to-date copies.

Further information on student responsibility is available on the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies website.

Academic and Scholarly Integrity

Background & Purposes

The University recognizes that teaching, research, scholarship and creative activity are most likely to flourish in a climate of academic freedom. The University community has always recognized the necessity for maintaining the highest ethical standards in the conduct of Scholarly Activities. Individuals are expected to assume direct responsibility for the intellectual and ethical quality of their work. The University of British Columbia has developed this Policy to communicate expectations, increase awareness of integrity issues, and encourage scholars (be they students or members of faculty and staff) to assume personal responsibility.

The purposes of this Policy are:

  • to promote scholarly integrity among scholars, in order to maintain and enhance the value of impartiality that universities offer society;
  • to proscribe activities which breach generally acceptable standards of scholarly conduct; and
  • to provide a process for dealing with allegations of Scholarly Misconduct in a timely manner.

1. Scope

1.1. This Policy applies to all full-time and part-time faculty, staff and students of the University and any person (including clinical faculty and visiting professors) who teaches, conducts research, or works at or under the auspices of the University.

2. General

2.1. Individuals are personally responsible for the intellectual and ethical quality of their work and must ensure that their Scholarly Activity meets University standards.

2.2. Members involved in Scholarly Activity must not commit Scholarly Misconduct.

2.3. The University will investigate allegations of Scholarly Misconduct in a timely, impartial and accountable manner and take appropriate action, including any necessary steps to preserve evidence, when it becomes aware of allegations of Scholarly Misconduct. Investigations are always subject to the principles of Natural Justice.

3. Definitions

3.1. “Fabrication” means invention or forgery of research data or citations.

3.2. “Falsification” means alteration, selective omission or misrepresentation of research data or citations.

3.3. “Investigative Committee” means a committee appointed by the Vice-President for the purpose of investigating a particular allegation.

3.4. “Natural Justice” is comprised of two main principles:
the decision maker is impartial; and
the respondent is provided with a fair hearing (i.e. the respondent is informed of the allegation made against him or her; is provided with an opportunity to respond to the allegation; and has the right to be represented).

3.5. “Plagiarism” means the presentation of the thoughts, writings or inventions of another as one’s own or the presentation of thoughts, writings or inventions without proper scholarly attribution.

3.6. “Principal Investigator” means the person who has primary responsibility for a research project. In the case of a project funded by an external or internal grant, this will normally be the holder of the grant. In the case of a project that is not funded, this will normally be the initiator of the project. The Principal Investigator is usually the supervisor of the research team (which may include other researchers) and is usually a faculty member.

3.7. “Scholarly Activity” means teaching, research, scholarship or artistic/creative activity carried out in the course of a faculty, staff or student’s work or studies at the University and includes activities that would be appropriate for inclusion on a curriculum vitae or in an Annual Report to a Department Head.

3.8. “Scholarly Misconduct” means conduct that deviates significantly from that which is acceptable within the relevant scholarly community and includes without limitation:

  • Plagiarism;
  • Fabrication or Falsification of research data;conflict of scholarly interest, such as suppressing the publication of the work of another scholar;
  • the unfair evaluation of a student’s work;
  • failure to comply with the University’s policies and procedures on research;
  • failure to obtain all required approvals for research involving animal and human subjects, biohazards, radioisotopes, environmental effects, or failure to conduct such research in accordance with the protocols prescribed;
  • conduct that contravenes guidelines or procedures on scholarly integrity that are adopted by afaculty for scholarly communities within that faculty;
  • failure to give appropriate recognition, including authorship, to those who have made a materialintellectual contribution to the contents of the publication or research project, and only those people;
  • failure to equitably allocate interest of inventorship in proportion to the intellectual contribution of the contributors;
  • the use of unpublished work of other researchers and scholars without proper permission or without due acknowledgement;
  • the use of archival material in contravention of the rules of the archives;
  • prior to public disclosure, the use of new information, concepts or data originally obtained through access to confidential manuscripts or applications for funds for research or training as a result of processes such as peer review without obtaining permission of the author;
  • failure to use scholarly and scientific rigour and integrity in obtaining and analyzing data, and in reporting and publishing results;
  • failure to comply with the terms and conditions of funding sponsor(s) when applying for and using research funds;
  • failure to disclose to the University, journals, funding sponsors or those requesting opinions, any conflict of interest, financial or other, that might influence their decisions on whether the individual should be asked to review manuscripts or applications, test products or be permitted to undertake work sponsored from outside sources; and
  • failure to respect the intellectual property rights of others in the conduct of research, the development of academic materials, and the dissemination of results
  • but does not include situations of honest error despite due diligence, conflicting data or valid differences in experimental design or in interpretation or judgment of information.

3.9. “Vice President” means either the Vice-President, Research or the Vice-President, Academic who
is the central point of contact for a particular allegation.

For information on procedures, please click here.

 

Intellectual Property

All members of the UBC community must be knowledgeable about intellectual property so that they can protect their own rights and respect the rights of others.

The University of British Columbia has several policies referring to intellectual property. These policies apply equally to all students, faculty and staff, regardless of their position at the University. Whether undergraduate student or full professor, everyone has equal rights and obligations. The policies also apply to others connected with the University, such as visiting faculty or researchers who develop intellectual property using University facilities or with funds administered by the University.

The policies generally apply to scholarly work conducted while you are enrolled at or employed by the University. Copyright and other intellectual property rights to scholarly and literary works—including books, lecture notes, laboratory manuals, artifacts, visual art and music—produced by those connected with the University belong to the individuals involved. Publishers of these works may acquire copyright as a condition of publication.

Further information on intellectual property is available on the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies website.

Patents and Licensing

Background & Purposes

To encourage the public use and commercial application of inventions, and in so doing to protect the rights of the inventor and the University.

1. Definitions

1.1. Audiovisual and computer materials include, but are not limited to, audio and video tapes, films, slides and photographs, computer programs and computer-stored information.

1.2. Invention or discovery includes data bases, audiovisual and computer material or equivalent circuitry, biotechnology and genetic engineering products and all other products of research which may be licensable.

1.3. Literary Works include, but are not limited to, books, lecture notes, laboratory manuals, artifacts, visual art and music.

1.4. Publication means putting the public in possession of an invention by way of speech, talk, paper, tape, video recording or other electronic means, drawing, photograph, printed work, or any other disclosure given or distributed, except on a confidential basis. Deposition of a thesis in the University Library constitutes publication in the above sense and may prejudice patent action unless an appropriate provision is made for limited accessibility to the thesis.

2. General

2.1. Members of faculty or staff, students and anyone connected with the University are encouraged to discuss and publish the results of research as soon and as fully as may be reasonable and possible. However, publication of the details of an invention may make it impossible to seek patent protection. Public use and commercial application are frequently facilitated by patenting and licensing arrangements.

2.2. Discoveries, Inventions, Audiovisual and Computer Materials: If any member of faculty or staff, any student, or anyone connected with the University proposes to protect or license an invention or discovery in which University facilities or funds administered by the University were used, a disclosure must be made to the University and the rights assigned to the University. The University may decide to protect or license the discovery or invention, in return for a share of any proceeds arising. If the University decides not to protect or license, the rights may be reassigned to the inventor, who may then develop commercial application of the invention or discovery as he/she sees fit. Where it is anticipated that inventions or discoveries may ensue from a particular research enterprise, it may be necessary to undertake special agreements concerning patent or licensing rights before the research funds are accepted for administration by the University.

2.3. Literary Works: Ownership of and intellectual property rights to “literary works” produced by those connected with the University are vested in the individuals involved.

Dissertation and Thesis Preparation

Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies (G+PS) has various online resources that you should familiarize yourself with, including formatting requirements and frequently asked questions. Additionally, the UBC Research Commons provides services including thesis formatting and citation management.

 

Graduation

Every candidate for a degree must make a formal application for graduation. You will receive an email from Enrolment Services inviting you to apply. This email will indicate the application deadline.

Students can make a formal application for graduation via the Student Service Centre (SSC).  The application must be submitted if you plan to graduate, regardless of whether or not you intend to participate in the scheduled ceremonies. If your request to graduate is not approved by the Faculty of Applied Science or Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies, a reapplication for the next congregation will be required.

Students can access the SSC one week prior to the ceremonies to confirm that they have been approved for graduation.

No student will receive a graduation diploma until all academic fees have been fully paid.

Leaves and Extensions

On-Leave Status

Students who find it necessary to interrupt their graduate studies may apply for on-leave status.  Leave is granted when a student is best advised for personal, health or other reasons to have time completely away from their academic responsibilities.  Leave, not including parental leave or leave to pursue concurrent programs, is limited to one year for Master’s students and 2 years for Ph.D. students. A leave will normally begin on the first day of a term, for a period of four, eight, or twelve months.

Students granted leave-of-absence or parental leave retain the full value of any University graduate fellowship or other award whose terms and conditions are established by Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies.  Awards will be suspended at the onset of the leave and reinstated at the termination of the leave period, provided the student returns to full-time study at that time. Other awards will be paid according to the conditions established by the donor or granting agency. 

Leaves of absence must be approved by the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies.  Your first point of contact when applying for leave will be to email help [at] ece [dot] ubc [dot] ca with the dates of your request and the type of leave requested.

Requests for leaves for medical reasons must be accompanied by a doctor’s note recommending the leave.

It is understood that students with on-leave status will not undertake any academic or research work, or use any of the University’s facilities during the period of leave.  Students must inform the University immediately upon return. Building access requests during leaves will be denied.

The time spent on-leave is not counted as part of the allowed time for completion of the degree. On-leave students continue to be registered and must pay a reduced fee for the leave period.

Parental Leave

A graduate student who is bearing a child or who has primary responsibility for the care of an infant or young child is eligible for parental leave. A request for parental leave should be made to the department by emailing help [at] ece [dot] ubc [dot] ca. Students are permitted to leave for a minimum of 4 months to a maximum of 12 months.  Where possible, students enrolled in course world should coordinate their leave to coincide with the beginning of an academic term.

Leave to Pursue a Second Program of Study

Following academic consultation, graduate students may apply for leave of absence from one program to pursue a second program of study. In this case, the student is responsible for both on-leave tuition fees as well as the tuition fees associated with the second program. A leave of absence for these reasons may exceed one year. Time to completion of the first degree program would be extended by the span of time on the leave of absence.

Extension

Extenuating circumstances not of the student’s making may justify allowing the student additional time to complete their degree program.  A request for a one year’s extension will be received favourably by Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies if it is fully justified and supported by the student’s Supervisor.

A second year’s extension requires a compelling rationale from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and an explanation of the special circumstances that would justify an exception.

All extension requests must be made first to the department by emailing help [at] ece [dot] ubc [dot] ca and must include a schedule showing how the thesis will be completed in the period requested.

Extensions will not be granted beyond two years.

 

Further information on leaves and extensions can be found on the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies website.

M.A.Sc. Program

The Master of Applied Science (M.A.Sc.) program is intended for students who are interested in pursuing advanced studies and research at the graduate level. Students who wish to have the option of continuing on to a Ph.D. should take the M.A.Sc. instead of the M.Eng. 

Students in the M.A.Sc. program must have a thesis supervisor upon being admitted to the program. 

Advising inquiries can be directed to the M.A.Sc Program Advisor at masc-advising [at] ece [dot] ubc [dot] ca.

Program Length:

Master’s degree candidates registered as full-time students are required to spend at least one winter session at the University. The M.A.Sc. program is expected to take about 24 months to complete. Candidates may also register as part-time students by submitting a Schedule B form to help [at] ece [dot] ubc [dot] ca before their program start date. Please note that we are unable to change a program back to full time once a program has started. In either case, the program must be completed within 5 years of initial registration.

Students must maintain continuous registration throughout all years until graduation by keeping up with tuition fee payments. If a degree is not awarded within 5 years of initial registration, the student’s eligibility for the degree will end without completion. Under exceptional circumstances, extensions may be granted by the Dean of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies.

Students who, for health or personal reasons, including childbirth and having primary responsibility for the care of a child, must interrupt their studies, should apply for leave (see Leaves and Extensions).

Minimum Grades:

A minimum of 60% must be obtained in any course taken for the student to be granted pass standing. However, only 6 credits of pass standing may be counted towards a Master’s program. For all other courses, a minimum of 68% must be obtained.

Fail (F) for individual courses is defined as below 60%.  If a course is repeated, both marks will appear on the transcript. The higher mark will be used to determine promotion and in any decision to admit or withdraw a student from the program.  For all other purposes, averages will be calculated using both marks. See Unsatisfactory Academic Progress under Academic Progress for information on failed course procedures.

 

Program Requirements

M.A.Sc. Requirements

·       Completion of a thesis (12 credits); and

·       Minimum of 18 credits of other course work, usually completed within the first year of registration

·       at least 12 credits at the 500 level 

·       a maximum of 6 credits at the 400 level

·       at least 6 credits in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

·       for students with degrees in subjects other than Electrical and Computer Engineering, at least 12 credits must be taken in the
        Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

·       Directed studies can count for a maximum of 3 credits towards your degree

Students are required to obtain approval of their course selection from their thesis supervisor.

 

M.A.Sc. Recommended Timeline

Prior to Start Date

·       Discuss with Supervisor course selection, expectations of both the student and supervisor, policies and timelines

·       Register for courses

First Month

·       Meet with supervisor to discuss coursework, research plan

Fourth Month

·       Decision made on research or advanced development project in consultation with supervisor

Eighth Month

·       Project Outline

·       Complete yearly Progress Reports

Second Year

·       If you and your supervisor wish you to upgrade to a Ph.D., ensure that you have completed requirements within first 18 months

·       Discuss research results from first year, possible further research, timeline to thesis completion

·       Complete research

·       Ideally, student will complete writing the thesis by the end of the second year

·       Complete yearly Progress Reports

Thesis Submission

·       Approval by supervisor. This may be an iterative process.

·       Supervisor will identify members of the examining committee (must comprise of Supervisor, a Co-Reader and Committee Chair)

·       Make copies of thesis publicly available and to examining committee at least one week prior to thesis defense date

·       Examination

Submission of signed thesis approval form and thesis to Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies.

Master’s Thesis Defense

M.A.Sc. exams are typically scheduled by the supervisor by emailing help [at] ece [dot] ubc [dot] ca with the date, time, and examining committee member details. After approval by the Graduate Advisor, copies of the thesis must be distributed to the members of the students’ Supervisory Committee for review, with at least one week allowed for reading and comments prior to the exam date.

The examining committee will comprise of the Research Supervisor, one Co-Reader, and the Committee Chair. The Chair is responsible to the Head of the Department and to Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies, and she/he acts as moderator of the exam.

The M.A.Sc. examination serves as a departmental review of the candidate and his/her research. An audience is welcome. It will proceed as follows:

  1. The student will present a brief summary of the thesis (not to exceed 25 minutes in length).
     
  2. Members of the audience should be asked for questions. Following these questions, a short break should be announced to allow any members of the audience to leave if they desire.
     
  3. This will be followed by an oral examination in the general area of the thesis. Each examiner should ask questions for 15-20 min, with the option of a brief second round for follow-up questions. The Chair may ask a question or two out of interest or for purposes of clarification but is not normally expected to do so.
     
  4. Following the examination, the candidate and audience members will be asked to leave the room and the Committee will hold an in camera session. The Chair will ask the Committee members to give an opinion of the student and the student’s performance during the examination, and moderate a discussion to determine the final grade. 
                    • The grade will be based on the quality of the research and the preparation and defense of the thesis. To assist in this a marking guide is provided.
                    • A failing grade (less than 68%) must be accompanied by a written summary outlining the reasons for this decision. There is no recourse for a student who fails the exam. The examining Committee may recommend a reexamination. 
                    • The examining Committee may recommend that the thesis is acceptable in the form presented, or it may request changes be made to the thesis before the title page is signed. Responsibility for ensuring that such changes are made will lie with the Supervisor.

  5. The Chair will then recall the student and Supervisor and announce the decision and grade. The Chair may ask at this time that the title page of the thesis be signed by the Committee or may ask that the student first make required revisions. Note that the signed title page has to be of “thesis-bond” paper as required by the UBC Library.
     
  6. The Chair will complete an M.A.Sc. Examination Report and submit it to the department in a timely manner.

After members of the Examining Committee have signed the thesis approval form, the candidate will submit the thesis to Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies, either as a .pdf, or hard copy.  See Masters and Doctoral Thesis Preparation and Submission for full details.

M.Eng. Program

The Master of Engineering (M.Eng.) is a program of study suited to students who wish to pursue their electrical and computer engineering education beyond the undergraduate level but do not wish to pursue a thesis-based research program.  The M.Eng. program takes about 12-18 months to complete if pursued on a full-time basis.

This policy and procedure page is intended for students already registered in the program. If you are prospective student considering applying to the Master of Engineering Program in Electrical and Computer Engineering please visit our Master of Engineering Program page.

Find out more about the Electrical and Computer Engineering, Master of Engineering Program.

Additional policies for M.Eng. students can be found on the Faculty of Applied Science website

Advising inquiries can be directed to the M.Eng Program Advisor ameng-advising [at] ece [dot] ubc [dot] ca.

Starting Your Degree


Review Student Responsibilities

It is very important that you familiarize yourself with UBC’s policies on academic honesty, intellectual property, and registration. Please review UBC's Graduate and Post Graduate Studies Student Responsibilities at the very beginning of your degree.


Choose Between Full-time and Part-time Before You Start Your Program

The typical completion time for the M.Eng. degree is 12-16 months if pursued on a full-time basis. M.Eng. degree candidates registered as full-time students are required to spend at least one winter session at the University. Candidates who are Canadian Citizens or Permanent Residents of Canada can also complete the M.Eng. on a part-time basis, and can register as part-time students by submitting a Schedule B form to help [at] ece [dot] ubc [dot] ca before their program start date. Please note that we are unable to change a program back to full time once a program has started. In either case, the program must be completed within 5 years of initial registration.


Engineering Co-op

Students may add a Co-op element to their program. This will increase the total completion time but may lead to a project suitable for EECE 597.  MEng students who are interested in participating in the Engineering Co-op Program must submit their applications directly to the co-op office. 

Find out more about: 
Engineering Co-op
Engineering Co-op handbook and policies


Choose between coursework or a mix of courses and an engineering project

After completing one term, an M.Eng. candidate can choose to conduct an engineering project and write a report in the candidate's area of specialization, in lieu of 6 credits of conventional coursework. Students will receive guidance from their project supervisor in developing the research topic. The report may be based on work performed outside the university in conjunction with an Engineering Co-op placement or a volunteer position. In this case, someone outside the university may have involvement with the project supervision, but the final mark will be decided by the Program Advisor.

Students can also design their own projects in this course. Students are encouraged to approach individual faculty members if they have project ideas. The faculty member will be responsible for the day-to-day direction of the project and will agree on a final mark with the ECE M.Eng. Program Advisor (MPA). Unlike a research degree, there is no expectation that this project will be publishable, although students are encouraged to submit it to the UBC eCircle repository. Confidential work can form part of a project and although this does not need to be published, the faculty supervisor and MPA must be able to review it.

Find out more about: 

UBC eCircle


M.Eng. Program Requirements

M.Eng. candidates have two options for completing the necessary 30 credits. ECE courses must make up at least 15 of the overall 30 credits. Advising is conducted through the meng [at] ece [dot] ubc [dot] ca (ECE M.Eng. Program Advisor (MPA)) and the lampe [at] ece [dot] ubc [dot] ca (ECE Graduate Advisor). Directed studies can count for a maximum of 3 credits towards your degree.

 

Option 1

 

EECE 500 Level or above

500 Level or above

Candidate's Choice 300/400/500 Level

Credits

12

12

6

Option 2

 

EECE 500 Level or above

500 Level or above

Candidate's Choice 300/400/500 Level

Supervised Project  EECE 597

Credits

12

6

6

6

 

Option 2 is similar to offerings at other universities. If a student takes 4 courses in each of the first two terms plus a summer project the requirements would be completed in one calendar year. Students who chose Option 2 will work with a project supervisor to develop a project. When a project has been established, the student must register in EECE 597 for the term in which the project will be completed. Although the requirements may vary between projects, all EECE 597 students must submit a final report to be graded by their project supervisor.  

A minimum of 60% must be obtained in any course taken for the student to be granted pass standing. However, only 6 credits of pass standing may be counted towards a Master's program. For all other courses, a minimum of 68% must be obtained.

 

Choose your courses

Students are free to choose any selection of courses they wish within the guidelines above. The following groupings of core courses are recommended for students with specific interests. There is no guarantee that any graduate course will be offered in a particular year, but an effort will be made to offer the courses in the lists below.

The M.Eng. is an Electrical and Computer Engineering degree; there is no sub-classification on the certificate. Any courses taken will appear on the transcript.

Communications

Computer Systems

Energy Production

Energy Utilization

Micro/Nano Electronic Systems

Signal Processing

Software Engineering

Find out more about ECE courses.

 

 

Managing Your Progress

Satisfactory Progress

For Master of Engineering students, the minimum passing grade in any course is 60%. However, only 6 credits of courses with grades in the C to C+ range (60-67%) may be counted towards a master's program. For all other courses, a minimum of 68% must be obtained. 

Unsatisfactory Progress

On the recommendation of the graduate program and the approval of  the Faculty of Applied Science (for MEng students), the student may repeat a course for higher standing or take an alternate course.  When repeating a failed required course, a minimum mark of 74% must be obtained.  Higher minimum grades may be required. 

If the graduate program does not make such a recommendation, or if the recommendation is not approved by Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies or Faculty of Applied Science, the student may be required to withdraw.  A student who obtains a grade of less than 68% in an excessive number of courses will normally be required to withdraw.  The student will be informed of unsatisfactory academic progress in writing before any action regarding withdrawal is taken.

Fail (F) for individual courses is defined as below 60%.  If a course is repeated, both marks will appear on the transcript. The higher mark will be used to determine promotion and in any decision to admit or withdraw a student from the program.  For all other purposes, averages will be calculated using both marks.

Leaves and Extensions

Leave is granted when a student is best advised for personal, health or other reasons to have time completely away from their academic responsibilities.  Leave, not including parental leave or leave to pursue concurrent programs, is limited to one year for Master’s students. 

Your first point of contact when applying for leave will be to email help [at] ece [dot] ubc [dot] cawith the dates of your request and the type of leave requested. If approved by the Department ECE will then request Deferred Standing for you from Graduate and Post Graduate Studies.

Withdrawal and Reinstatement

Students will normally be required to withdraw if they do not make adequate academic progress. When a student is required to withdraw, the academic record will indicate “required to withdraw”.

Transfers

Between M.Eng and M.A.Sc

The department will request confirmation from your supervisor that she/he is in support of transferring credits to the new program (maximum of 24 M.A.Sc. credits to your M.Eng. requirements, and maximum of 12 M.Eng credits to your M.A.Sc requirements.) Note that only courses with a minimum of B standing (74% at UBC) will be considered for transfer.

From Ph.D. to M.Eng

Transfers from Ph.D. to a Master’s program should not be for academic reasons, but rather must be justified on the appropriateness of a student’s personal or professional goals. Further information on transferring from a Ph.D. program is available on the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies website. 

 

Graduating

Students who have completed the requirements of their program must send an email to help [at] ece [dot] ubc [dot] ca to have their program/courses reviewed. If the requirements have been met, the department will prepare a program completion form to send to the Faculty of Applied Science. Students must also submit a graduate application through the SSC.

 

Any further information can be provided by emailing help [at] ece [dot] ubc [dot] ca (subject: M.Eng%20Application) .

Ph.D. Program

The Doctoral (Ph.D.) program is designed to develop the candidates ability for independent research. Applicants to the program must have a high scholastic standing and demonstrated an aptitude for research to be admitted to the Ph.D. program. A minimum of 24 credits of approved courses is required for adequate completion. For those holding a Master's degree or transferring from a Master's program, appropriate credit will be given for courses completed. Courses are intended to provide both a general intellectual proficiency and specialization in a selected area.

Advising inquiries can be directed to the Ph.D Program Advisor at phd-advising [at] ece [dot] ubc [dot] ca.

Supervisory Committee:

Students in the Ph.D. program must have a thesis supervisor upon being admitted to the program. The supervisory committee, comprised of two additional members, should be established by the end of the first year in the program.

Please click here for further information regarding the supervisory committee.

Program Length:

Doctoral students are expected to study full time, and will normally be required to spend a minimum of two consecutive years of full time study at the University.  Substantial completion of the Ph.D. requirements is expected within 3 years for students with a Master’s degree and within 4 years for those students who have transferred from the M.A.Sc.

Students must maintain continuous registration throughout all years until graduation and keep up with tuition fee payments. If a degree is not awarded within 6 years of initial registration, the student’s eligibility for the degree will end without completion. Under exceptional circumstances, extensions may be granted by the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies. Students who, for health or personal reasons, including childbirth and having primary responsibility for the care of a child, must interrupt their studies, should apply for leave (see Leaves and Extensions).

Minimum Grades:

A minimum of 68% must be achieved in all coursework. Where less than 68% is obtained, and on the recommendation of the graduate program and approval of the Dean of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies, the student may repeat the course for higher standing or take an alternate course. When repeating a failed required course, a minimum mark of 74% must be obtained.  Higher minimum grades may be required. 

See Unsatisfactory Academic Progress under Academic Progress for information on failed course procedures. 

 

Program Requirements

Ph.D. Requirements

·       Minimum of 24 credits of approved courses

·       Directed studies can count for a maximum of 3 credits towards your degree

·       For those holding a Master’s degree or transferring from a Master’s program, appropriate credit (maximum 18 credits) will be given for courses completed.  The courses are intended to provide both a general intellectual proficiency and specialization in a selected area.

·       Qualifying Exam recommended at 15 months

·       Completion of a thesis

Ph.D. Recommended Timeline 

First Month

·       Meet with supervisor to discuss expectations of both student and supervisor, degree requirements, course selection, policies, research plan and timelines

First Two Terms

·       Complete required coursework. Must be completed with a passing grade (68%).

·       Begin research.

Within 12 months of registering

·       Formation of the Supervisory Committee

·       Prepare for the Qualifying Examination

·       Complete the yearly Progress Reports

Within 15 months of registering

·       Take the Ph.D. Qualifying Examination/Thesis Proposal Defence to be admitted to Ph.D. Candidacy

Following years

·       Complete yearly Progress Reports

·       Complete research.

·       Complete thesis within 6 years of initial registration

Ph.D. Qualifying Examination

A comprehensive examination is a Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies requirement for the Ph.D. program. Normally, the examination will be held after the completion of all required course work. The comprehensive examination is in addition to any course examinations and is intended to test the students understanding of the chosen field of study as a whole and the students preparation for the thesis research to follow. A Ph.D. student must satisfy all the course work requirements and pass the comprehensive examination before being admitted to Ph.D. candidacy. In the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, the comprehensive examination is in the form of the Ph.D. Qualifying Examination.

Effective September 2014, the first-year progress report will be used to confirm that the student is on track towards the PhD Qualifying Examination, which is recommended to be held within 15 months of a student's program start date. If the student is not able to meet the 15 month deadline, he/she will be asked to submit another progress report requesting and explaining the need for a 3-month extension. Another progress report will be due every 3 months until the qualifying exam. If the qualifying exam has not been held within 24 months after the program start date, the student will prepare a status report for the supervisory committee and the department (Graduate Advisor) with a detailed plan for how to prepare for the examination. Based on the report, the supervisory committee and the graduate advisor will determine further deadlines for the student.

  1. Within 15 months of registering a Ph.D. candidate must take the Ph.D. Qualifying Examination. Prior to the examination being scheduled a Ph.D. proposal has to be approved by the Graduate Advisor.

  2. The purpose of the examination is to ascertain whether the proposed topic is suitable for a Ph.D. thesis and whether the candidate is capable of carrying out the work required to successfully complete the Ph.D. degree. Suitability relates largely to the possibility of making original and significant contributions. Capability relates largely to knowledge and understanding of material in the subject area of the proposal as well as areas related to it that affect the proposed research.

  3. The examination consists of the presentation of the proposal for the thesis work, followed by questions from the examining committee. The questions are to address both the specific research topic and topics related to the general subject area of the proposal.

  4. A two-hour period is scheduled for the examination. The first 25 minutes of which are devoted to the presentation of the proposal. Under no circumstances will the presentation be allowed to exceed 30 minutes.

  5. Within 12 months of registering, the candidate should submit a draft copy of the proposal to the Graduate Advisor who will then advise the candidate on the acceptability of the format of the proposal and on the scheduling of the examination.

  6. At least one week before the examination, the candidate must give a copy of the proposal to each member of the examining committee.

  7. The written proposal should have 3 chapters:
    • Introduction and Overview: in which the background to and motivation for, the proposed topic is succinctly discussed. It is only this chapter that the necessary details of the work of others are to appear. This work must be clearly and properly referenced.

    • Work Accomplished: In which any original work that the candidate has done on advancing he state-of-knowldge on the proposed topic is described. The candidate is expected to show evidence, commensurate with the period since registering in the Ph.D. program, which demonstrates the viability of the thesis proposal and the plans for future work.

    • Work Planned: In which the procedures to be implemented in carrying out the remaining and probably major part of the work are outlined. A tentative time schedule for completion is also to be included in this chapter.


  8. The written proposal must not exceed 30 pages of normal typescript (12-point font, double-spaced with approximately 26 lines per page and 6.5-inch line length), plus extra pages for the list of references.

  9. The examining committee is comprised of the candidate's supervisory committee (supervisor plus at least two other members), plus Head's nominee plus the chairperson nominated by the Graduate Advisor who is either a full or associate professor. In event that the Graduate Advisor is the supervisor or is on the supervisory committee, the chairperson is to be appointed by the the Department Head.

  10. The chairperson ensures that the committee uses good judgement about questions on related topics. She/He does not normally participate in the questioning except to clear up misunderstandings or at the end of the questions by the other members of the committee, to expose possible important weaknesses. The chairperson votes in a riving at the committee decision.

  11. The examining committee may make one of the following recommendations:
    • The candidate continue on the Ph.D. program.

    • The candidate be given a conditional pass.

    • The candidate be re-examined within 3 months time.

    • The candidates case be reviewed by an arbitration committee.

    • The candidate be asked to withdraw from the Ph.D. program but permitted to complete requirements for the M.A.Sc. degree.

    • The candidate be withdrawn from the University.


  12. All recommendations of the examining committee must be submitted in writing to the Graduate Advisor of the Department and be signed by all members of the committee.

  13. If the vote of the examining committee is unanimous, the recommendation stands.

  14. In the event of recommendation 11B, the pass is subject to satisfactory correction of specified deficiencies of a minor nature. Assessment of these corrections is to be the sole subject of a meeting of the committee and the candidate. The outcome of this assessment cannot be again category 11B.

  15. In the event of recommendation 11C, the re-examination is a completely new examination. The outcome of this examination cannot be again category 11C.

  16. If the vote of the examining committee is not unanimous, the case will be referred to an arbitration committee. The arbitration committee will consist of all the full professors in the Department and will be chaired by the Graduate Advisor of the Department. The candidate's supervisor must be present and the proposal must be available during the discussion. The supervisor will not be present during the vote. Where a member of the arbitration committee (full professors) is the candidates supervisor, she/he must withdraw during the vote. The chairperson of the arbitration committee votes but if there is a tie the supervisor's vote will also be counted.

Permission to Teach

According to Policy 75 Appointment of Graduate Students to Teach a Course in which a Board of Governors Appointment is Required:

1.1.  A Master’s student may not hold an appointment to teach a course or courses in which a Board of Governors appointment is required.

1.2.  Until admitted to candidacy, a doctoral student may not hold an appointment to teach a course or courses in which a Board of Governors appointment is required except that in special circumstances, with the approval of the head of the department in which the student is registered and the Dean of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies, the student may be given an appointment to teach no more than six credits of undergraduate course work per term.

1.3.  A doctoral student who has been admitted to candidacy may be granted an appointment as a part-time lecturer (teaching duties normally to be limited to no more than six credits of undergraduate course work per term). Such appointment requires the written approval of the Dean of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies.

Doctoral Examination – Final Oral Defense

Department Exam:

Purpose:

  • To obtain department approval of the thesis for submission to the external examiner of the Final Oral Defense

Exam Committee:

  • The exam committee for the Department exam is typically the same committee as for the PhD Qualifying exam

  • The committee consists of four members; the supervisory committee (Supervisor/Co-supervisor/Committee member) and the Head's Nominee/Chair.

Structure:

  • The Department exam is not public

  • The Candidate makes a presentation of the dissertation (roughly 30 minutes)

  • The Examining Committee questions the Candidate

  • The Examining Committee holds an in-camera discussion

  • The Head's Nominee conveys the findings of the Examining Committee to the Candidate

  • The Department Exam usually lasts two hours

 

Final Oral Defense:

Purpose:

  • To ensure the Candidate is able to present and defend the dissertation and its underlying assumptions, methodology, results and conclusions in a manner consistent with the doctoral degree being sought;

  • To communicate the results of the work to the campus community

Structure:

  • The Candidate makes a public presentation of the dissertation (roughly 30 minutes)

  • The Examining Committee questions the Candidate

  • Members of the audience are invited to ask questions of the Candidate

  • The Examining Committee holds an in-camera discussion

  • The Chair conveys the findings of the Examining Committee to the Candidate

  • The Final Oral Defense usually lasts two and a half hours.

  • A positive report from the external Examiner is required for the Final Oral Defense to occur.

  • For more details on Oral Defense Procedure, Roles of the Examining Committee, and Evaluation Protocol, click here.

Resources

We encourage students to look into the many resources on campus designed to help students get the most out of their time at UBC.

Access & Diversity: http://students.ubc.ca/about/access

Counselling Services: http://students.ubc.ca/livewell/services/counselling-services

ECE Graduate Student Association: http://gsa.ece.ubc.ca

Enrolment Services: http://students.ubc.ca/about/esp

GPS: Graduate Pathways to Success: https://www.grad.ubc.ca/current-students/gps-graduate-pathways-success

Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies (G+PS): https://www.grad.ubc.ca

Graduate Student Society: http://gss.ubc.ca/main/

International House: http://students.ubc.ca/international

Irving K Barber Learning Centre: http://www.ikebarberlearningcentre.ubc.ca

Office of the Ombudsperson for Students: http://ombudsoffice.ubc.ca

Walter C. Koerner Library: http://koerner.library.ubc.ca  

Safety

Students in the Electrical and Computer Engineering program are required to follow safety procedures and complete general safety training, Bullying and Harassment training, and other lab/course specific training, as requested.

All injuries and potentially dangerous incidents must be reported. Please see http://ece.ubc.ca/safety for safety procedures. For all urgent Health and Safety concerns/inquiries, or to report an incident to the department, please contact safety [at] ece [dot] ubc [dot] ca.

Supervision

 
As a graduate student, you are making a commitment to devote the time and energy needed to engage in research and write a thesis. Your supervisor has a right to expect substantial effort, initiative, respect and receptiveness to suggestions and criticism.
 
The principal role of the supervisor is to help students achieve their scholastic potential. They will provide reasonable commitment, accessibility, professionalism, stimulation, guidance, respect and consistent encouragement to the student.
 
 

Handbook

As a graduate student, you are making a commitment to devote the time and energy needed to complete your program requirements and/or engage in research and write a thesis. Your supervisor has a right to expect substantial effort, initiative, respect and receptiveness to suggestions and criticism.

The principal role of the supervisor is to help students achieve their scholastic potential. They will provide reasonable commitment, accessibility, professionalism, stimulation, guidance, respect and consistent encouragement to the student.

For research students, the supervisory committee should be in place by the end of the first academic year.  Details on graduate student-supervisor relationships and expectations can be found in the Handbook of Graduate Supervision

Expectations Documents

All incoming MASc and PhD students and their supervisors will be given a set of expectation documents. Students are required to meet with their supervisors at the onset of their program to discuss the roles, responsibilities, and expectations of both student and supervisor.

Supervisors of students with program start dates prior to September 2014 are encouraged to use this document as well to facilitate a discussion on the graduate student-supervisor relationship.

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MASC Expectations .docx449.46 KB
PHD Expectations .docx446.27 KB

Changing Supervisors

Changing circumstances and life events may lead either you or your supervisor to consider ending the working relationship.  A change of supervisors may be the best option for both the graduate student and the supervisor:

·       Supervisor leaves the university

·       Incompatibility of the graduate student and supervisor

·       Funding

·       Student changes area of interest

Changing supervisors is a big step.  It can be stressful and take time that you might otherwise spend on your work. Before you take this step, consult the Handbook on Graduate Supervision for suggestions on guiding you through the decision-making process.

Departmental Procedure for Changing Supervisor  

·       Attempt to resolve the issue through discussion with the Graduate Advisor and the original supervisor

·       Ensure that both “old” and “new” supervisors are part of the decision

·       Notify the department by emailing help [at] ece [dot] ubc [dot] ca

Transfers

Students wanting to transfer programs should send an email to help [at] ece [dot] ubc [dot] ca with their request. A transfer must be approved by their graduate supervisor, the department, and Faculty of Applied Science/Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies.

Between M.A.Sc. and M.Eng.

The department will request confirmation from your supervisor that she/he is in support of transferring credits to the new program (maximum of 24 M.A.Sc. credits to your M.Eng. requirements, and maximum of 12 M.Eng credits to your M.A.Sc requirements.)

Note that only courses with a minimum of B standing (74% at UBC) will be considered for transfer.

M.A.Sc to Ph.D.

Students who wish to transfer from a Master’s program to a Ph.D. program must have completed one year of study in the Master’s program with:

·       minimum of 18 credits

·       minimum 80% average in 12 credits

·       at least 9 of these credits must be at the 500 level or above

·       at least 9 credits must be at 80% or above

·       successful completion of a Ph.D. Qualifying Exam

·       the student must also show clear evidence of research ability.

Transfer directly into a Ph.D. program should be accomplished after the first year of study and will not be permitted after the completion of the second year in a Master’s program. Transfers may not be retroactive. The transfer must be clearly justified by the student’s supervisor in a memorandum to Graduate Studies recommending the transfer.

If a student transfers from a Master’s program to a Ph.D. program without completing the Master’s degree, the commencement of the Ph.D. program will be from the date of first registration in the Master’s program.

Further information on transferring to a Ph.D. program is available on the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies website.

Ph.D. to M.A.Sc./M.Eng.

Transfers from Ph.D. to a Master’s program should not be for academic reasons, but rather must be justified on the appropriateness of a student’s personal or professional goals.

Further information on transferring from a Ph.D. program is available on the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies website

Between Departments

Students requesting a transfer to or from another department should discuss it with their supervisor and review the G+PS policies at https://www.grad.ubc.ca/faculty-staff/policies-procedures/transfer-new-p...

Vacation Policy

Graduate students are entitled to three weeks of vacation (15 working days) from their academic obligations per academic year. Please see the G+PS website for details. 

Visiting Student to Another University

For UBC students visiting other universities, credits completed while a visiting student at another University must be approved for credit at UBC by the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies prior to registering at the host university.  UBC students can visit other universities using the Western Dean's Agreement, Graduate Exchange Agreement and other exchange agreements at Go Global.

Partner institutions in the Western Deans' Agreement are:

Partner institutions in the Graduate Exchange Agreement are:

In order to be eligible to use these exchange agreements, the student must be in good standing in his or her graduate program at the home institution and must have paid all current and back fees.  Further, the student must demonstrate that the course is an integral part of the student’s graduate degree program.

Note: Students in the MEng program are not eligible for the WDA and Graduate Exchange Agreements:

Please note that the request must be fully approved at least two weeks prior to the start of the course. If the form is not received and approved in time, the student may not receive permission to take the course. In addition, the fee waiver is not available retroactively. Please ensure that Western Deans’ Agreement and Graduate Exchange Agreement forms are processed quickly to ensure that students are not denied registration in a course or required to pay fees unnecessarily at the Host Institution.

Withdrawals/Reinstatement

Withdrawals

Required to Withdraw

Students will normally be required to withdraw if they do not make adequate academic progress according to the requirements outlined in the section “Academic Progress”. When a student is required to withdraw, the academic record will indicate “required to withdraw”.

Voluntary Withdrawal

A student wishing to voluntarily withdraw from the University must obtain the approval of their Supervisor and Graduate Advisor.  When the withdrawal is approved, the academic record will indicate “voluntary withdrawal”, the date of withdrawal and a standing of W in all courses not completed on that date.

If withdrawal is not approved, the student will remain registered in all courses and a final grade and/or standing will be assigned at the end of the term.

A student who does not complete formal withdrawal procedures will be liable for all assessed fees until such procedures are completed.

Withdrawal for Non-Registration

A student who fails to register and/or becomes absent without leave from their program for two or more consecutive terms will normally be withdrawn from the program. The Department must first make reasonable attempts to contact the student by email and regular mail. If there is no response after repeated attempts, the Department may recommend that the student be withdrawn. The Department must send copies of the written attempts to contact the student and a memo confirming the non-registration and non-attendance of the student to Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies.

The academic record will indicate “withdrawal – did not register”.

Required to Withdraw for Non-Academic Reasons

Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies reserves the right to require a student to withdraw from a program of study if the Faculty, in consultation with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, considers the student to be unsuited to proceed with the study or practice of the chosen discipline or field of study.  Request to withdraw for non-academic reasons would not prevent the student from immediately applying for entry into a different program of study.

A student must be informed in writing by the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of unsatisfactory progress and given an opportunity to discuss the matter with their Supervisor before any recommendation for withdrawal is made to Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies.

Readmission/Reinstatement

Readmission

A student in any graduate program who is required to withdraw will not normally be eligible to apply for readmission to the University for at least one year. After one year, students who have been required to withdraw may be admitted to a different program in the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies provided that they meet all admission requirements in effect for that program at the time they apply. Such applications must be accompanied by a statement from the graduate program which recommended withdrawal outlining the reasons for which the student was required to withdraw.

Students who have been required to withdraw may also apply to be readmitted to the same program after at least one year has passed from the effective date of withdrawal. Compelling evidence must be presented that a more successful outcome is likely if the student is to be readmitted. All cases for readmission must be reviewed and approved by the Dean of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies. Students required to withdraw from a graduate program more than once are not eligible to be considered for admission to any program in the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies.

Reinstatement

If a student's registration laspses, he or she may be permitted to resume the program as long as he or she is in good standing and that the time limit for degree completion has not expired. A student who is required to withdraw for academic reasons is not eligible for reinstatement. Further information on reinstatement can be found on the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies website.